Home / Smart Travel / What’s new: Where to see the Northern Lights

Smart Travel

What’s new: Where to see the Northern Lights

Travellers come from far and wide to catch a glimpse of Mother Nature’s greatest light show, and there’s a wealth of new ways to see the ever-elusive aurora

What’s new: Where to see the Northern Lights
The Aurora Borealis above a forest in Sweden. Image: Getty

Share this

Finland on the move
If the lights aren’t coming to you, then why not go to them? Guests at the Aurora Wilderness Camp can do just that as they bed down in a mobile cabin, sitting on its own nifty pair of skis. The glass-ceilinged cabins are currently located in rural Kilpisjärvi, but each season move to the area with the best chance of seeing the lights. Booking starts in January 2019; itineraries from £1,399 per person. offthemap.travel

Sweden through the lens
The aurora is a notoriously tricky subject, but if you’re keen to snap those spectral, mint-green ribbons, then this one’s for you. Starting this December, Lights Over Lapland’s Wilderness Aurora Photo Adventure heads to the mountains of Abisko National Park. Budding photographers learn about the DSLR cameras provided to help with those perfect shots. From £145 per person.

Canada on four wheels
It doesn’t get more intrepid than a trip in the iconic Tundra Buggy. Departing throughout February and March, Frontiers North’s Northern Lights and Winter Nights adventure takes travellers into the darkest patches around Churchill, Manitoba, for Inuit culture, polar bear-spotting and light viewing from the buggy or rooftop observation deck of the Aurora Lounge. From £3,416 per person.

Iceland between the sheets
Privacy’s the name of the game at Panorama Glass Lodge, perched amid the rugged, rural landscape just half an hour from Reykjavik, with just snow-capped mountains and a tranquil fjord for company. But the star-strewn skies are the biggest draw: the newly opened, family-owned bolthole has a glass ceiling for aurora-ogling. From £373 per person. panoramaglasslodge.com

Published in the December 2018 issue of National Geographic Traveller (UK)