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In pictures: Colours of Morocco

From its sweeping landscapes to the close-ups of locals in action, still-frame shots give just a taste of this peaceful country

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A waterfall cascades through a cedar forest in the Middle-Atlas, a mountain range in Ifrane. Image: Getty

A waterfall cascades through a cedar forest in the Middle-Atlas, a mountain range in Ifrane. Image: Getty

Traditional Moroccan leather babouche slippers (minus heels) are left outside a doorway in Chefchaouen, the all-blue city in the Rif Mountains. Footwear here is strictly designated for indoor and outdoor use. Image: SuperStock

Traditional Moroccan leather babouche slippers (minus heels) are left outside a doorway in Chefchaouen, the all-blue city in the Rif Mountains. Footwear here is strictly designated for indoor and outdoor use. Image: SuperStock

Near the city of Meknès lie the crumbling ruins of Volubilis, a former Roman city and UNESCO World Heritage Site. The partly excavated Berber and Roman ruins are thought to date from the third century BC. Image: Getty

Near the city of Meknès lie the crumbling ruins of Volubilis, a former Roman city and UNESCO World Heritage Site. The partly excavated Berber and Roman ruins are thought to date from the third century BC. Image: Getty

At the foot of the High Atlas Mountains, a woman at the Kasbah of Roses guesthouse, in the Valley of Roses, sifts through the pink petals for buds to be used in cosmetics, cooking and for home decoration. Image: Getty

At the foot of the High Atlas Mountains, a woman at the Kasbah of Roses guesthouse, in the Valley of Roses, sifts through the pink petals for buds to be used in cosmetics, cooking and for home decoration. Image: Getty

A Berber shepherd boy holds two of his lambs — raising sheep and goats for meat and milk is commonplace in the Moroccan villages of the Atlas Mountains. Image: Getty

A Berber shepherd boy holds two of his lambs — raising sheep and goats for meat and milk is commonplace in the Moroccan villages of the Atlas Mountains. Image: Getty

Chouwara is one of a trio of ancient leather tanneries found in Fez. Skins are tanned and dyed in the vats using a mix of pungent natural chemicals before being left out on the rooftops to dry. Image: Getty

Chouwara is one of a trio of ancient leather tanneries found in Fez. Skins are tanned and dyed in the vats using a mix of pungent natural chemicals before being left out on the rooftops to dry. Image: Getty

Morocco’s High Atlas Mountains rise in the west at the Atlantic Ocean. In the foreground sits a verdant palm-clad oasis. Image: Getty

Morocco’s High Atlas Mountains rise in the west at the Atlantic Ocean. In the foreground sits a verdant palm-clad oasis. Image: Getty

Rising above the Medina, the ornate Hassan II Mosque — the third largest mosque in the world — lights up the port city of Casablanca after dark. Image: Getty

Rising above the Medina, the ornate Hassan II Mosque — the third largest mosque in the world — lights up the port city of Casablanca after dark. Image: Getty

Under a canopy of stars, bodies gather round a campfire in Merzouga, a village in the Sahara, to keep warm. Image: Getty

Under a canopy of stars, bodies gather round a campfire in Merzouga, a village in the Sahara, to keep warm. Image: Getty

The mausoleum built in honour of one of Morocco’s greatest rulers — the sultan who made the imperial city of Meknès his capital in the 17th century — consists of three brightly decorated courts, a mosque and the tombs of Moulay Ismail and his family. Image: Getty

The mausoleum built in honour of one of Morocco’s greatest rulers — the sultan who made the imperial city of Meknès his capital in the 17th century — consists of three brightly decorated courts, a mosque and the tombs of Moulay Ismail and his family. Image: Getty

Meaning ‘fortified place’ in Arabic, Morocco’s coastal capital is filled with colonial architecture including the Kasbah of the Udayas, towering over the mouth of the Bouregreg river. Image: Getty

Meaning ‘fortified place’ in Arabic, Morocco’s coastal capital is filled with colonial architecture including the Kasbah of the Udayas, towering over the mouth of the Bouregreg river. Image: Getty

Sandwiched between the Atlantic Ocean and Atlas Mountains, the tiny beach town of Mirleft is famed for its secluded coves and for the red cliffs of El Gezira, which have eroded over time to create vast natural arches. Image: Getty

Sandwiched between the Atlantic Ocean and Atlas Mountains, the tiny beach town of Mirleft is famed for its secluded coves and for the red cliffs of El Gezira, which have eroded over time to create vast natural arches. Image: Getty

The white dunes of the Sahara desert meet the golden sands of the Atlantic Ocean in the desert city of Dakhla, capital of the administrative region of Dakhla-Oued Eddahab. Image: Getty

The white dunes of the Sahara desert meet the golden sands
of the Atlantic Ocean in the desert city of Dakhla, capital
of the administrative region of Dakhla-Oued Eddahab. Image: Getty

A cluster of Moroccan lanterns hang in a souk among the tangle of streets of the Medina, in the Old City. The lanterns range from simple tin designs to more ornate and grand creations. Image: Getty

A cluster of Moroccan lanterns hang in a souk among the tangle of streets of the Medina, in the Old City. The lanterns range from simple tin designs to more ornate and grand creations. Image: Getty

The sun sets over the lake and pavilion at the Menara gardens. The ancient olive grove and desert garden were originally established and landscaped under the Almohad dynasty in the 12th century. Image: Getty

The sun sets over the lake and pavilion at the Menara gardens.
The ancient olive grove and desert garden were originally established and landscaped under the Almohad dynasty
in the 12th century. Image: Getty

Travellers cross the dunes surrounding the small desert village of Merzouga — a starting point for sunset camel rides across the Saharan sands. Image: Getty

Travellers cross the dunes surrounding the small desert village of Merzouga — a starting point for sunset camel rides across the Saharan sands. Image: Getty

A man dressed in a burnous walks through the courtyard of the Ben Youssef Madrasa, in Marrakech. Dating back to 1565, the former Islamic college is a tranquil spot nestled away from the bustling city streets. Image: Takashi Nakagawa

A man dressed in a burnous walks through the courtyard of the Ben Youssef Madrasa, in Marrakech. Dating back to 1565, the former Islamic college is a tranquil spot nestled away from the bustling city streets. Image: Takashi Nakagawa

Seagulls soar over the rock-strewn coast close to Sqala de la Kasbah, built to defend against attacks from the sea. Beyond its fortified walls and fishing harbours, the coastal town is famed for its watersports. Image: AWL Images

Seagulls soar over the rock-strewn coast close to Sqala de la Kasbah, built to defend against attacks from the sea. Beyond its fortified walls and fishing harbours, the coastal town is famed for its watersports. Image: AWL Images

Hairpin bends zigzag through the Dadès Gorges between the High Atlas Mountains and Jbel Saghro range. Rain showers in the valley during the spring feed orchards of fig, almond and olive trees. Image: AWL Images

Hairpin bends zigzag through the Dadès Gorges between the High Atlas Mountains and Jbel Saghro range. Rain showers in the valley during the spring feed orchards of fig, almond and olive trees. Image: AWL Images

Maze-like Chefchaouen is noted for its narrow streets rinsed in over 50 vivid shades of blue — thought to have been introduced by Jewish refugees in the 1930s, to represent the sky and heaven. Handily, the blue is also thought to repel mosquitoes. Image: AWL Images

Maze-like Chefchaouen is noted for its narrow streets rinsed in over 50 vivid shades of blue
— thought to have been introduced by Jewish refugees in the 1930s, to represent the sky and heaven. Handily, the blue is also thought to repel mosquitoes. Image: AWL Images

Leather pieces, dyed yellow using turmeric, are spread out to dry on the rooftops at the Chouwara tannery in the Medina — one of the most iconic sights in Fez. Image: AWL Images

Leather pieces, dyed yellow using turmeric, are spread out to dry on the rooftops at the Chouwara tannery in the Medina — one of the most iconic sights in Fez. Image: AWL Images

A date palm-dotted stretch of green in a dry and rocky landscape, the Draa River Valley in the Atlas Mountains reaches out to the Sahara. Along its path is the Kasbah Tamnougalt, built in the traditional way, using mud, stone and unmilled timber. Image: 4Corners

A date palm-dotted stretch of green in a dry and rocky landscape, the Draa River Valley in the Atlas Mountains reaches out to the Sahara. Along its path is the Kasbah Tamnougalt, built in the traditional way, using mud, stone and unmilled timber. Image: 4Corners

Traditional fishing boats line the harbour in the village of Taghazout, known for its calamari and surf spots. Close to the city of Agadir, the inhabitants of the village rely on fishing — and the production of argan oil — as their main sources of income. Image: 4Corners

Traditional fishing boats line the harbour in the village of Taghazout, known for its
calamari and surf spots. Close to the city of Agadir, the inhabitants of the village rely on fishing — and the production of argan oil — as their main sources of income. Image: 4Corners

Ouzoud Falls: Its name means ‘the act of grinding grain’ in Berber (testament to the many mills in the area) with the highest fall cascading down from 328ft. The falls are set amid gorges, groves, lush valleys and orchards. Image: Getty

Ouzoud Falls: Its name means ‘the act of grinding grain’ in Berber (testament to the many mills in the area) with the highest fall cascading down from 328ft. The falls are set amid gorges, groves, lush valleys and orchards. Image: Getty

These images were part of the Morocco photography exhibition, presented at the World Travel Market 2016 and were published in the November 2016 issue of National Geographic Traveller (UK) Photography Magazine

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