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Stay at home: West Cornwall

The Roseland Peninsula is home to unspoilt beaches, secluded coves, pretty fishing villages and one of the country’s most scenic coastlines

Stay at home: West Cornwall

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A glimpse of Cornwall at its best: making, baking and gossiping with George Pascoe and Lindsey Thomas at the four-year-old Philleigh Way Cookery School. I dined on my efforts too; homemade cheese and vegetable pasties, red-blooded chuck steak pasties, and scones with clotted cream and jam — no low-fat alternatives here.

What to do

01 A 15-minute walk to Portscatho village, part of a National Trust coastal path, where I stopped for ice cream at the Plume of Feathers — a pint’s a good option too.

02 A picturesque 20-minute ferry ride from St Mawes to Falmouth — it saves a 29-mile car journey — takes in some fantastic views of both Pendennis and St Mawes castles.

03 Racing model remote-controlled sail boats at the National Maritime Museum in Falmouth.

Where to eat

Seek out the Hidden Hut, overlooking Porthcurnick Beach, for coffee and freshly made lunches, but be sure to pre-book its sell-out, bring-your-own-plates (and alcohol) rustic Feast nights. Held outdoors three times a month, Feast tickets are sold online. September’s menu is pork belly and crackling or Kashmiri lamb.

Where to stay

A short walk to the Cornish coast? A super cafe on the doorstep? Cue The Rosevine, a boutique hotel with apartments that are ideal for families: there’s a self-catering kitchenette area and enough space for children to have their own room. With its own indoor pool and restaurant, its homebody appeal is a winning combo.

Don’t miss

Spending time on Porthcurnick Beach, a beautiful southeast-facing sandy cove, where kids can build sandcastles, go rock-pool hunting and brave the cold waves.

Published in the September 2017 issue of National Geographic Traveller (UK)