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Travel Writing Competition

Travel Writing Competition

 

Enter our travel writing competition and you could win a once-in-a-lifetime trip to volunteer in China and see Giant Pandas up close.

Calling all young writers (aged 18 to 23) with a passion for travel, if you think you’ve got what it takes, then put pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard) and send us 400-500 words about your most inspirational travel experience. If you’ve ever considered yourself as a budding writer who is looking for an avenue for your talent, and can really weave a tale, then why not give it a go? Your piece doesn’t have to be based on somewhere exotic; it just needs to offer a fresh perspective to a familiar destination, event, or experience. We’re not looking for flowery evocations, we’re looking for a writer who can engage us and take us on their fantastic journey. No matter how big or small.

OUR TRAVEL WRITING TIPS:
>> Familiarise yourself with National Geographic Traveller’s style, tone and content.
>> Always question what makes your article different from all the others we may have received on the same topic or destination.
>> Your article should have a beginning, a middle and an end, and the opener should be one of the strongest paragraphs to pull the reader in. You don’t have to tell a story in chronological order — you can open with an exciting event and then explain how it began.
>> Ensure that your piece has a strong central theme that provides a point to it all.
>> Do not try to cover too much in one article — there’s often several different angles within each piece but focus on one.
>> Be honest — if you felt frightened or out of your depth, say so.
>> Use dialogue if you can to add personality and colour.
>> Bring a destination to life by describing smells, sounds, flavours
and emotions.
>> Be aware of the political, environmental and social background to the places you describe.
>> Avoid travel clichés like ‘a city of contrasts’ and ‘an island paradise’.
>> Check your facts and be wary of making generalisations or statements you’re unsure of.